A Student’s Take on Classical Education

By Jayna Hoover, WCA High School Student

In a world where memorization is considered to be education and academic reward is solely performance based, the heart of schooling and scholarship has been lost in the pressures of test scores, GPAs, and having enough extracurriculars. Students are taught that the purpose of their education, their hard work, is to get into a “good college” and later have a high-paying job. But if administrations are focused only on creating people that can contribute to society, how does that affect the quality of the people whose minds they are shaping, and how does that teach them to think about who they are and about their purpose in life?

Because of my classical education, I am being given an advantage over my fellow peers. While I am memorizing a lot of information, earning good test scores, and am involved in many extracurriculars, I am being taught something of much greater value, something that can’t be measured with numbers: I am being taught how to think for myself. I am being taught formal logic, where I learn how to ask good questions, how to construct strong arguments, and how to identify weak ones in others. I am being taught the Great Books, about the cultures and times they were written in, how they impacted the people they were written for, and why they are still relevant today. I am being taught Latin, which I use in everyday life, despite it being considered a “dead language.” I am being taught rhetoric, where I learn how to improve my thinking, what makes a great speaker, and how to effectively and persuasively communicate my beliefs and convictions to others.

Most importantly, however, I have been taught to examine the world from a Christian worldview. I have been taught the Scriptures, and am writing them on my heart as I memorize them every week. I am reading large portions of the Bible, discussing its power, implications, and even its difficulties. I am being taught to view the world, view others, and view myself the way God does. What Classical Education means practically is that I get to learn the way countless generations before me have, and I get to learn how to reason, think, and write well in order to be taken seriously so I can impact the world for my Creator and Savior, Jesus Christ.

In a world where test scores and GPAs are teaching young minds that their purpose is to add to society, I am being taught how to think not only well, but for myself—that my purpose is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever.

Comments are closed.